Noxious Weed Control Board

Snohomish County Weed Control Board
The local county noxious weed control board and weed district carries out the state's noxious weed law at the local level. Each county board is composed of five directors who volunteer their time and effort to oversee the county noxious weed program. Washington State University Cooperative Extension agents serve as ex-officio, non-voting county weed board members.
 
Snohomish County Noxious Weed Control Board members serve as responsible stewards of Snohomish County by protecting and preserving the land and resources from the degrading impact of noxious weeds. 

Board members

  • John Tellesbo, District 1
  • Don Tillman, District 2
  • Vacant, District 3
  • Ed Stocker, President, District 4
  • George Ohlsen, District 5
  • Curt Moulton, Ex-officio member

 

2016 meeting schedule/minutes


Meetings are held at 9:00 a.m.
Snohomish County Operations Center Conf Room
8915 Cathcart Way, Snohomish, WA 425-388-7548
View public notice of board meeting schedule. 

2015 meeting schedule/minutes

2014 meeting schedule/minutes


Mission
The mission of the Snohomish County Noxious Weed Control Board members is to serve as responsible stewards of Snohomish County by protecting and preserving the land and resources from the degrading impact of noxious weeds.

Background
The Board was formed in 1980 as a response to requests to control Canada Thistle and Tansy Ragwort. Canada thistle was the first weed listed for control in the county due to its invasiveness and threat to agriculture.

Washington State Noxious Weed Board
At the state level, noxious weeds have a long history, dating back before statehood. In 1881, the territorial legislature enacted a law "To prevent Spread of Chinese and Canada Thistles." This legislation made it the duty of the landowner to control certain weeds on property they owned or managed.

The State noxious weed law holds landowners, including state, county and city landowner/ managers, responsible for controlling weeds on their property. Federally owned lands are subject to the Federal Noxious Weed Act. Since many people are unfamiliar with noxious weeds and the weed law, the State and County Weed Boards are available to provide information on identification and control options. Landowners can choose the control method they think is most appropriate for their property. When property owners fail to comply with RCW 17.10, the Snohomish County Noxious Weed Control Board may control noxious weeds or contract for their control at the expense of the property owner.

View more information on the State Noxious Weed Control Board website.